Talking to your boss when he's in a bad mood isn't always a good idea, but sometimes we don't have a choice. 

Talking to your boss when he’s in a bad mood isn’t always a good idea, but sometimes we don’t have a choice. 

Most people avoid talking to their boss when they’re in a less good mood. But, sometimes you have something that just can’t wait and you have to approach it.

So, how do you do this without alienating it?

Know what you mean

There is nothing worse than being interrupted by someone who stutters for hours on end before getting right to the point. Avoid this by having a good idea of ​​what to say before you approach it. Take a few minutes to find the best way to share your problem so that you don’t take more time than you need to.

Don’t try to stick to his mood

bad mood can be contagious, so make sure you don’t let your boss’ stress affect you. Keep a cool head during your conversation, and even if he is a little nervous or abrupt, don’t let that go, nor let him affect your mood. You won’t get anything if your conversation turns into an argument.

Stay professional

If your boss is feeling stressed, your words should be kept as concise as possible. Stick to strictly work-related topics and get straight to the point about what you expect from him. Only bad leaders vent their bad mood, if your boss does, it’s his responsibility, not yours.

Don’t fight his bad mood

You don’t want to turn a quick conversion into a street brawl, so don’t try to tackle why he’s in a bad mood. Not only does this mean that your conversation will take longer, but it could also seem patronizing, depending on your relationship with him. None of these options will work well for you, focus on what you need.

Identify trends

If your boss is in a bad mood on a regular basis, try looking for patterns in their behavior. For example, Monday morning can be a particularly stressful time for professionals, so avoid making that time more difficult than it is. By observing his behavior, you can also keep an eye out for potential triggers, such as his personal criticisms. Once you better understand why he’s in a bad mood, you’ll know better when to approach him.

By Admon

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